Furry friends

I am now post chemotherapy, which ended at the beginning of August. It was always nice to come home and see my big white cat, Casper. He's always friendly towards me, but doesn't like being picked up and is definitely not a lap cat. He's a rescue cat, who's been with us for five years now and is about 10 years old.


Comments

  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 1,086 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Teresa68

    Hi Teresa,

    It is lovely to hear from you again.

    It is also lovely to see Casper, he looks like a very contented cat, although watching you intently, haha! 😄 I agree with you, it is always do great to see our cats when we come home even if we have only been out during the day! They are always so pleased to see us.

    We have had a few rescue cats too, but Charlie and Lola are from a local farm, we got them as kittens. Interestingly Lola used to be like Casper in that she didn't like being picked up or a lap cat. That all changed when we moved, now she is the opposite! I don't know what happened. Charlie is all over us all the time!

    I hope you are doing ok after chemo, and you are recovering from that treatment. My experience has been it takes a long while!

    Have a good evening

    Lou x

  • Teresa68Teresa68 Posts: 7

    Thank you. Lovely to read about your cats. Casper has a docile temperament, but his white fur does get everywhere! He loves being brushed and having his ears scratched. He's quite big, about six kilos, with the most brilliant blue eyes, (although not deaf as some white cats are), so I often wonder what mixture of breeds he is.

    I am fairly well at present. I had to see one of the surgical team recently, (who had performed the Whipple's procedure, over a year ago now), and he was pleased that I looked so well. He told me in a nice way that he didn't want to see me again. The only slight worry on the horizon is that a recent scan showed a shadow where the blood vessels joined the liver, but that may be scarring. He agreed with my oncologist's view, as I am looking so well and not losing weight, that I don't need further chemo unless things change (which I hope not!). I still get quite exhausted as the day wears on especially when I try and do too much. I am surprised though how angry I get and can erupt very quickly - my poor husband! It may be because I'm half Maltese and have a Latin temperament that shows sometimes, but it's probably all that's happened to me over the last 18 months.

  • RobertARobertA Posts: 927 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Teresa68 @Sunshinedaff

    Hi Teresa

    Wow, Casper is a real cool customer, I could imagine him in a Bond movie. How does he keep so white?

    I remember you telling us about your Whipple procedure. It was a big deal and it sounds as if you have done really well. After all that, I am not surprised that you get tired and sometimes angry and I am sure your husband understands. My favourite singer, Chris Rea had the procedure about 20 years ago which is how I came to know a little about it.

    I wonder if you are able to ride your motorbike again? You will need to wrap up well to keep warm and dry at this time of year.

    Rob x

  • Teresa68Teresa68 Posts: 7

    I have only ridden my Triumph motorbike a few times in the past months, as I am still quite weak and can't do long rides at present.I fear I'm losing my confidence! I also have a Piaggio scooter I potter about the lanes on. I used to ride miles and miles, I loved it so, as I've always been a very reluctant car driver (only drive when I absolutely have to, and not at all recently!!).😊

  • RobertARobertA Posts: 927 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Teresa68

    Hi Teresa

    My own treatments took away some of my strength and energy and it affected my confidence too. It started to come back as I grew stronger and I am sure you will be the same

    Rob x

  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 1,086 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Teresa68

    Hi Teresa,

    It is lovely when a Dr says that sentence to you, I know! I remember when my radiotherapy oncologist said the same. A good day for sure. I don't think it is unusual to experience those feelings of rage and anger after everything you have been through Teresa. When going through treatment, we focus so much on getting through the physical aspect of things, that the emotional and mental impact can be sidelined and then the fallout of it all emerges later on own the road. It may be worth visiting your DR or even GP to discuss how you feel sometimes, I remember doing the same, as I felt as if I was sliding into depression, crying all the time, and I'd been given good news about the cancer. My GP was great in bringing it all into perspective for me, explaining how I had been through a tremendous lot, it was not unexpected I was feeling this way. It probably isn't all due to your Latin temperament! Don't blame yourself.

    I am assuming they will keep an eye on the shadow, and I hope it is as they think due to scarring from treatment etc.

    Hahaha! Cats! 😀, they do so love their ears tickled, when you try and remove your hand, grab hold of it again!! Lol.

    Chat soon,

    Lou x

  • Teresa68Teresa68 Posts: 7

    Hello,

    Thank you for your kind words. When I mentioned my bursts of anger to a nurse in the doctor's surgery, when she was taking blood before visiting the oncologist, she told me about the five stages of grief, which is what this is. It's not only about death, she said, and I should look it up, which I did, and I found very helpful.

  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 1,086 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Teresa68

    Hi Teresa,

    Oh that is brilliant, I am so glad the nurse was able to help you in some way. We also have Karin (@KarinSieger ) here, who is a specialist cancer counsellor, she has written some very helpful information. Teresa you are always welcome to come here and chat about anything anytime, there are many others here who will have empathy, and insight to help. You are not the only one, and you are not alone in this 😊.

    Lou x

  • KarinSiegerKarinSieger Posts: 82 Emotional Wellbeing Advisor

    @Sunshinedaff @Teresa68

    Thanks for the mention, Lou.

    Hi Teresa,

    Had a read through the discussion and yes, spot on, cancer does not just impact us physically but also emotionally.

    And yes, it also is about grieving eg everything that has changed and will never be the same again: the life we had before diagnosis / treatment, our self-confidence, certainty, independence just to mention a few.

    Going through my own cancer treatment I, too, was impacted by all of the above. And in some ways that always stays, just not as pronounced. I was very angry and irritable. But at the bottom of it was also a lot of fear. I call it "Cancer Anger" and explain a bit about it on my website 🗓 here or you can listen to my brief podcast episode 🎧 from the series 'Cancer and You' where I talk about cancer anger and the emotions we all go through. You can listen here.

    Finally, in case you feel the impact of cancer does not end with treatment, I explain why that is so and how to cope on 🗓 my website here

    You are always most welcome to reach out to me directly.

    Very best wishes.

    Karin

    Karin Sieger
    Psychotherapist | Writer | Podcaster | MA, BA (Hons) | Reg. MBACP (Accred)
    Helping you create new possibilities!
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