Personality changes and cancer

There isn't a "right" way to deal with cancer. Sadness, anger, hope, numbness, fear, determination, denial: the list of feelings you might experience along the journey is endless, and you have every right to feel them. However, sometimes there can be major, sudden changes in behaviour such as rage, depression and anxiety.

Have you noticed any personality changes in yourself or a loved one since treatment started?
«1

Comments

  • Tre_Tre_ Posts: 3
    Yes there has definitely been personality changes. My mum is a very strong person, something that has passed on to me and my daughters too, thankfully. Especially when they lost their Dad 9 years ago,from an accident,  and then my oldest lost her 25yr old husband to cancer after caring for him for 3 years. She has become cold and hard, a coping mechanism I guess. Mum has been very positive for most of this year, but this new treatment is bringing her down physically and mentally. What do you say when she says “ she wishes she was dead” ??? I can’t handle that as she is not terminally ill and has many good days. We wish my husband was still here, and my son in law never gave up. In fact he didn’t want to leave when his time came, he was thinking of my daughter, she had to tell him it was “ok to go”.
    How she coped I don’t know.  I just get on with looking after mum, it’s just natural, but I feel like I’m on my own a bit. I’m helping Dad loads too, he can’t do more than he does, he’s 76 and not physically that good, boy he looks warn out.
    I’m not rushed off my feet, I do have someone in my life now and do get away from it all 3 nights a week. I’m sorry but I’m not giving up my life completely, I’m only 51, does that make me sound bad ?? It helps to keep me sane this way, something else which I can’t go through again.  
    It feels good to get this off my chest, would appreciate any comments or your own experiences on this topic 🤔
  • RobertARobertA Posts: 253 ✭✭✭
    Good morning @Tre_  

    My goodness, you have been through a lot. 

    Firstly, let me say right away that it is very important that you have some pleasure in your own life and I am so happy for you.  It does not make you sound bad at all. We all need a bit of love and comfort and the needs and worries of carers often gets overlooked in the interests of the patients. 

    I was was diagnosed with an aggressive and incurable cancer two years ago. The treatments I receive keep me alive, but they have physical and mental side effects and they started to wear me down after a few months or so. I was eventually diagnosed with depression and the wonderful MacMillans provided me with a counsellor, who together with my wife, managed to put me together again over the next few months.  It was only then, that I understood how difficult my illness and depression had been for my wife and family. 

    You  have all had to cope with so much tragedy and loss already, and now this!  I wonder if your Mum and your daughter would benefit from some counselling. I was a doubter and accepted it only reluctantly, but it has helped me to find a way through the fog and confusion And now at 73 I still feel that life has much to offer. 

    Good luck
    Rob X 


  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    Hi @Tre_ ;

    You and your family have certainly been through so much and I am so sorry that you now face this struggle with your mum. It is good that you have strength, and tragedy does have a way of making us stronger, I can identify with that completely. I would echo what @RobertA ; says about the Macmillan nurses, or even speak to your mum's oncology nurses. I'm sure they would be able to provide you with information or access to support for your mum and even for you. I can imagine your daughter must be reminded of your son-in-law and how things were. It must be a painful reminder. Very tough for all of you. And No, taking some time out for yourself for your own well-being does not make you sound bad! It is vital, seriously, you have to live. You are not being selfish. x




  • tomyo10tomyo10 Posts: 1
    edited December 2018
    My wife was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer in March of 2013. She had a 3% chance to make it 8 months. A few weeks ago, she had her port removed because of nothing showing in any scans since the 2 rounds of chemo and numerous radiation therapies. Her short term memory is shot. And the chemo has caused osteoarthritis. 

    So, myself and everyone else thought, apparently incorrectly that this would cause someone to start to live their lives to the fullest. She beat cancer that had a 97% chance to beat her. But no.

    She has laid around, sleeps till mid afternoon. Does hardly anything but watch old games shows on TV. She is only 56. She is nasty to almost everyone. She has lost her son, her grandchild, her mother and her friends. I mean ALL of her friends.

    I have read about chemo brain and all the nasty side effects the treatments have caused. But the treatments don't cause these personality abuses. They just accentuate what was there before. She hasn't always been the nicest person in the world, and the chemo brain has taken it to a new level.

    She is on a few anti-depression meds that don't seem to help much. The next step has to be some sort of counseling I imagine- short of me leaving.

    People need to understand that it's not only that patient who endures this. It's the caregiver and the family who take the brunt of the abuse because the patient does not hold back. Then she'll just withdraw even more when I bring it up.

    I'm at the end of my rope here. If this sounds like anything anyone has gone through, please tell me how to continue. I'm basically the only one left who even cares about her in any way.


  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    Hi @tomyo10 ;

    Thank you so much for sharing this, I am so sorry to hear how much suffering you and your family have gone through, and how difficult it is for you. 

    You are right, beating those odds of cancer are truly amazing and celebrating life, living and moving forward would be the desired outcome. Have you had an opportunity to speak to anyone for yourself, has anyone been supporting you through this, Macmillan? GP? It sounds as if you have been carrying a tremendous burden whilst your wife has been unwell. It is extremely hard for people who care for those with cancer. I know my husband was ferrying me everywhere to hospital appointments, as well as hold down a full-time job, look after the children, the house, the school run etc. on top of dealing with his own emotional response to me having cancer. The strain of holding all of that together and stay positive is very hard. You sound like a person who has tried to support your wife as best as you can. 
    Depression is not unusual after going through cancer treatment, even if it is a good outcome. After having spent many months in the cycles of treatment, hospital visits, scans etc when you get told its all finished and you no longer have to spend all your time focussing on getting well, it can feel like you have been cut adrift suddenly. No-one telling you how your days are going to be. Radiotherapy was the last part of my treatment and I remember walking out after my last zap bursting into tears, I didn't know why. It was just, suddenly it was all over.  If your wife is agreeable, encouraging her to see a Dr to talk about the situation would be a start. For your own well-being though, I would encourage you also to get some support locally. I hope that you are able to see family too. 

     I hope you will find this community a place where you feel supported, people on here are friendly and understanding. 


    Lou x

  • RobertARobertA Posts: 253 ✭✭✭
    Hello @tomyo10

    Firstly, what an incredible recovery, it is a real medical success story. 

    Unfortunately, the cancer experience almost always seems to leave physical and mental side effects and that was certainly the case with me. Following three  months of fairly intense treatment, I was told that I only needed a quarterly infusion and blood test going forward and to go out and  enjoy myself. Far from doing so, I started to feel as if I had been abandoned and slowly withdrew into myself, unable and unwilling to make conversation or to find the energy to do anything at all. My wife was initially supportive, but inevitably became frustrated, and  we started to fall out and soon reached the point at which we were questioning our marriage.  We were lucky, because my doctor put me in contact with  Macmillans and they persuaded my wife and myself to receive counselling, both separately and together. It was not a quick fix, but it helped both of us to recognise that the cancer had changed both of our lives and how to work our way around that. 
    Like your wife, I am also on anti depressants, but it was the counselling which really helped me to understand what was going on in my head, and how to find a way forward. Macmillans offered me the counselling free of charge. I do not know if you have that service in your area, but I urge you to consider counselling. Depression is an illness. You cannot snap out of it and it sounds as if you both need support. 

    By the way, I absolutely ‘get’ that the challenges faced by the carer/partner can easily get ignored or overlooked and yet their rôle is so important.  I am pleased you found this community, It is a great site, full of caring and helpful people.

    Cheers
    Rob
  • SoozSooz Posts: 2
    I just found this site after searching 'does cancer make you crazy'. My partner of 32 years has Non-Hodgkins lymphoma, had completed RCHOP chemo in September and was just starting to feel better when he realized all of his lymph nodes were growing and other symptoms had returned. He was put on Ibrutinib yesterday to deal with CLL. It's been nine months of intense 'living with cancer' and I think he's lost his mind. He's mad at the world - doctors, people on TV, neighbours, and me. He lashes out verbally at the smallest perceived insult and when I try to explain why I said what I did I'm accused of all sorts of deception and avoidance. He's always been intense but this is beyond appropriate. I'm at my wits end dealing with this. I'm somewhat relieved to know this isn't uncommon. It's hard to remain loving and supportive when you have to walk on eggshells for fear of saying something that will be perceived as critical. I'm concerned that one day I'm going to react in anger and walk out the door and not come back. He can't live on his own (other disabilities before cancer) and financially we'd both be worse off but I don't know how much of this I can take. I have access to a counselor at the cancer clinic - I think its time to book an appointment to learn some coping strategies. Thanks for 'listening'.
  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    Hi @Sooz ;

    I am so glad you found the LBW site, I do hope you will find some help here to help you and your partner.
    I am so sorry, but not at all surprised at how intense these last months have been for you. I am also sorry that your partners health has deteriorated. You are not alone in what you have described above, I have read other's posts on here saying very similar things, although I appreciate that doesn't necessarily help you navigate through your own situation. Definitely, definitely make an appointment to see a counsellor. You need the support, if your partner would consider it, that would be really beneficial for you both. But if he isn't in a place to do so, you go anyway. A cancer diagnosis has such an impact on not only the person but loved ones also, unlike any other disease I would imagine. If you can get some support, you absolutely need it. I don't know where you are but are there any other cancer support agencies you can turn to? In the UK we have the Macmillan cancer support group who are excellent. I'm not sure your partner is 'crazy', but it does sounds as if he is very angry, hurting, and in pain, possible depressed,  because of the cancer, and clearly has not been able to deal with any of it yet. Nine months is not a long time, even though it may feel like an eternity. Anyone here who has been through cancer personally or with a loved one, will say its a massive shock, terrifying, because suddenly you are faced with uncertainty of the future. The fears attached to cancer are HUGE, fighting those is very tough. I am sure you have been through all of this too. Processing all of it takes a long time, and sometimes not even until treatment etc has ended. @RobertA , Rob has spoken before about how he struggled after his treatment, there are quite a few threads that he and I have chatted on. Also have a read through the Q&A's from Lucy's AMA last night, she addressed quite a few issues you may find helpful.
    Please know I am here should you ever want to chat about anything, I do hope you have family or friends also who can support you, but equally sometimes it is easier to talk to others not so close to you.


    Chat soon, 


    Lou x


  • RobertARobertA Posts: 253 ✭✭✭
    edited January 10
    Hi @sooz  I too am really pleased that you have found our site. As Lou @sunshinedaff says, there are a number of threads in this community referring to depression and anxiety as a cancer related issue, which you may find helpful. 
    It is becoming  increasingly apparent that there are two different illnesses which often go hand in hand.  Cancer and depression ( including anxiety etc.) 

    My doctors and clinicians were efficient and looked after my physical wellbeing very well, but my mental wellbeing was completely overlooked. I started to become more and more withdrawn and stopped communicating with my wife, or anyone else for that matter. I became impatient and angry. I did not know what was going on in my head but it consumed and scared me and unsurprisingly my marriage came under strain.  To be honest, at the time, I did not even care if my wife walked out, but I can't even imagine what might have happened to me if she had. I was really rescued by my doctor whom my wife and I had known for many years and he prescribed an anti depressant, but more importantly, referred me to a counsellor at MacMillans 
    with the outcome I referred to in an earlier post on this subject. 
    I think that men are much more reluctant to seek help than women are, but I urge you to persist and try to find some counselling help for both of you. 
    Depression is a major subject for me. I always thought that people with depression were wimps, but I know so much better now.  It is now my mission to persuade people to seek help for mental issues. Your situation is all too common for cancer sufferers and their partners who also have to cope with the worry of the illness and also their partner's personality changes.  You can work through it with professional help and I wish you both the very best.

    Keep in touch. 

    Rob x 
  • SoozSooz Posts: 2
    Thank you @RobertA and @Sunshinedaff for your words of wisdom and support. It helps to know we aren't the only ones going through this even though you are a long ways away. I'm in Canada so there's no MacMilllans to turn to but I'm familiar with their website and it is also a great resource. The cancer clinic here has a team of psychologists and I will be booking an appointment with them as soon as possible. I don't have any family close by but I'm lucky to have a few supportive friends who have assured me that I'm not losing my marbles. He's not out of control all the time and we have been able to have a few helpful discussions about how to cope with his anger and mood swings. All well and good when things are calm and reasonable but difficult when all hell is breaking lose. We've survived several health related crisis over the years and have pretty good coping skills but cancer just added a whole new level of fear and anxiety on top of someone who was already so depleted. I think he's just plain worn out from fighting to live. And I'm just worn out from being a caregiver. Thanks, Sooz
  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    Good morning @Sooz, (evening for you.)
    You will find a lot of support on here too for both of you. I am glad you do have some resources to go to, and a circle of friends who you can turn to.
    I understand how hard it is to find the strength to fight and also how hard it is to care for those we love who are unwell. If you are caring for your partner full-time are you able to get any help with that ? I think once you have begun to see a counsellor, hopefully it will become a little easier to hold on to hope, finding something to look forward to can help enormously to lift the spirits. It changes the focus, which we need. I really hope your partner will be willing to see someone. Will be thinking of you. Keep in touch.

    Lou x
  • LouiseJLouiseJ Posts: 152 mod
    Thanks Rob, I knew you'd have some great insight. 
     :) 

    Lou x
  • RobertARobertA Posts: 253 ✭✭✭
    Hi @sooz ;

    Great that you are able to seek help from the psychologists at your cancer clinic.  With the right help, you really can get through this together. My wife and I spoke to my counsellor separately and together and I still see the counsellor once a month for a chat.  It was not a quick fix but Mary (my wife) and I have learned so much about ourselves and each other. We know what is really important and what is not, and we are closer than we have been for years. We laugh at each other's silly jokes, we go out for a meal together at least once a week, we go on trips to the cinema and I even accompany her to the shops, though I wish she could walk past a shoe shop without going in. 
    I still have occasional bad days. Mary understands and accepts that and she gives me space which I use to play my piano, or just sit with my own company working through it. 

    My my oldest sister lived in Toronto for many years and my two nephews and one niece are actually Canadian. The boys love hockey and still talk about Wayne Gretsky.  It all looks very violent to me, but they say it is the best sport ever. 

    Good luck and let us know how you get on.
    Rob X 
  • RobertARobertA Posts: 253 ✭✭✭
    edited January 11
    Thanks Lou
    I have found that talking about it is actually good for me. I think lot of men have difficulty opening up, but it is so so cathartic to be able to talk about your feelings and fears. Ironically, a tough Liverpudlian friend of my wife opened up about his own depression after she told him of my struggles. Now he pops round for a cup,of tea and a chat. He's just a big softie really. Ha ha. 

    Rob X 
  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    Hi Rob,

    That is so good to hear. I love reading your posts, they really encourage others too I am sure. The fact your friend opened up to Mary shows the impact it has when we talk about things.
    It is getting better now but for too long there has been such a stigma surrounding depression. I don't know if it is still the case but I remember in the past filling in medical forms for jobs, and questions about depression having to be answered. Used to really annoy me, I don't remember seeing 'have you ever had a life threatening illness?' !! 
    Thank goodness times are changing!

    Hope you are having a good weekend, return to uni prep for us, already I'm crying!! Help!! 😄

    Lou x
  • gloden02gloden02 Posts: 35 ✭✭
    Hi  Rob and Lou and everyone. Just been reading all your posts. I have got so low lately. Got T cell peripheral NHL. Had six different lumps / sores on the surface and biopsies done. Had radiotherapy and 6 sessions of Chop Chemo ending last August. The latest lump appeared after the chemo so not sure if the chemo has worked. I’m to see my oncologist next Tuesday. Hoping and praying for good news as he said if this dident work maybe more radiotherapy or clinicle trials at Queen Elizabeth. Birmingham. Not sure I could take anymore. Still not really well from the chemo and got so frightened of it all. I started out so strong and confident. Have had few things going on which dident help. Cystitis and constipation and now cold sore. All I suppose because my immune system down.  Sorry I’ve gone on a bit. Glad I’ve found you all . Got 3 lovely daughters but don’t want them to worry more than they do now so thank you for listening. Love and hugs to all . Gloria xx
  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    @gloden02 ;


    Hi Gloria, 

    I am so sorry you are feeling so low at the moment, please don't suffer in silence on your own. I know we are here and will support you in every way we can, but can you speak to someone in person about how you are feeling? Dr, Macmillan? I am sure they would definitely be able to help you. Let the oncologist know on Tuesday too, as he may have access to help. I understand you are frightened, and the physical stuff that accompanies chemo is so unpleasant. Are you taking anything for the cystitis and constipation. They are so painful.  I remember the meds caused terrible constipation, I tried all the stuff drs gave me, plus resorted to tinned prunes! That cured it, but the process was painful. Yuk! Yes, your immunity is very low, that will impact your mental well-being too. 

    You are not 'going on', never apologise for talking!
    But don't give up hope Gloria, I and everyone else here is routing for you. Absolutely investigate any possible trials and other treatment. You have wonderful daughters, its not over! 

    Love and hugs to you too, 

    Lou x


  • gloden02gloden02 Posts: 35 ✭✭
    hi Lou. Thank you for reply and kind words. Yes I’m under Gp for Cystitis etc. It was the meds from Cystitis that gave me the constipation. Not nice. Then this cold sore arrived. I thought what next. Normally these minor things would not worry me but I think I’ve got paranoid and linking everything to the cancer. My daughters keep asking me out or to their homes but I’ve not felt like going anywhere since Christmas. However my two younger daughters are insisting today. They are picking me up in the car and we are going for a coffee or garden centre or both. I’ve actually put some make up on . First time for days. Will try and make the effort. Thank you again. Hope you are ok and sending you hugs xxx
  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    edited January 12
    @gloden02 ;

    Hi Gloria, I am so glad your daughter's have insisted to take you out and you are going out. It will do you the world of good, lovely garden centres (I love them!), and coffee and cake, definitely a must! :) 
    If they ask to have you to their homes again, accept the offer, it doesn't do us any good to be alone dwelling, that's when the darkness can become overwhelming. I am sure your daughter's would say to you it doesn't matter if you don't feel like talking etc, that's not the point of being with them. They love you. Woohoo...make up! I think I'm doing good if I remember the lippy..haha=) .

    I am well thank you, getting my daughter ready to return to uni tomorrow, so...washing...packing food etc, and generally trying not to cry again (unsuccessfully)! :) .


    Have a lovely afternoon, 

    Love and hugs ..

    Lou x
  • RobertARobertA Posts: 253 ✭✭✭
    Good afternoon Gloria

    it sounds as if you have three really lovely daughters and it is only natural that they want to look after you. 
    You have been through so much already and it is really not surprising that it is all wearing you down. 
    As we all know, a cancer diagnosis is different to any other and I do not think it is unusual to imagine that every ache and pain, lump and bump are attributable to it. I recently started getting pain in my lower back and legs and quickly diagnosed myself  with cancer. It turned out to be polymyalgia rheumatica and easily treatable.
    It is only natural that you will feel anxious leading up to the meeting with your oncologist on Tuesday and it should be a bit easier when you know exactly what you are facing. I do hope that you will let us know how you get on. 
    Lou is right you know. If you can make the effort to go out with your daughters, you really should do so. Even if you do not feel like communicating, it is better than being at home on your own and the girls will appreciate it. I always find coffee and especially cake to be very therapeutic. 
    Lou also mentioned MacMillans and/or your doctor. If you are feeling overwhelmed and down, please ask for help. I have experienced depression and needed professional support to get through it.  You have been through so much more than I have and I really admire you for putting that make up on. You are very brave.
    Keep in touch.

    Rob X 


  • RobertARobertA Posts: 253 ✭✭✭
    edited January 12

    Thank you for your kind words Lou @Sunshinedaff

    I love reading your posts too. I see the thoughtful and caring way you relate your own experiences and your understanding of how people feel. Your advice is always relevant, helpful and insightful. The Community is lucky to have you.

    You will miss your daughter. It sounds as though you are really close.

    Rob xx

  • gloden02gloden02 Posts: 35 ✭✭
    Hi Lou and Rob. I went with my girls today to a garden centre. Had a little stroll round but started feeling faint so we went to cafe and had tea and teacakes. Then walked a little way around outside plants. Soon felt unwell again but at least it’s a start. I’ve gone so weak. My middle daughter Catherine is talking about the two of us going out for Sunday lunch tomorrow. She lost her husband very suddenly 12 months ago heart attack. I lost her dad, my lovely husband 12years ago so she and I are there for each other. I’m so glad I’ve found this site and so appreciate both of your lovely words to me.  You both write such caring understanding posts. I thank you so much. Lots of hugs xxx
  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    @gloden02 ;

    Hi Gloria, 

    Well done for making it out, even for a little while. Doing it in small steps is good. you need to build your strength up gradually. Did you manage lunch yesterday? It is lovely that you are so close with your daughters, and that you and Catherine are able to support one another. It must be very difficult for her currently with anniversaries looming, bringing everything back into sharp focus. 

    Hang in there Gloria, don't forget speak to the oncologist tomorrow about how low you have been feeling as he may be able to help.

    Gentle hugs to you, 

    Lou x
  • gloden02gloden02 Posts: 35 ✭✭
    Hi Lou. Dident feel like lunch yesterday but we went for a short walk which did me good I think. Still got this bowel problem. So worried and got myself so low about it. Since the cancer I think I’m paranoid. My Gp is lovely and I am now on Fibregell to see if that works. I’m seeing her Wednesday. Yes seeing my oncologist tomorrow. Two of my daughters are taking me. Hope all is ok and he will say he doesn’t need to see me for some time. Hope you are well and thank you for your kindness . So good to talk to you xxx
  • RobertARobertA Posts: 253 ✭✭✭
    @gloden02
    Hi Gloria
    You will be pleased to get your meeting with the oncologist out of the way tomorrow. I have to see my specialist for an infusion and blood test every three months and I always feel anxious in the run up to our meeting. It is entirely normal and you will feel better once you have been. I do agree with Lou that you should mention your low moods to your oncologist and perhaps to your doctor as well. 
    I do feel for you and for Catherine  over the loss of your husbands. I can't begin to imagine how you have coped.  It is lovely that you and your three daughters are so close and supportive of one another.

    Do let us know how you get on.

    Rob X 

  • gloden02gloden02 Posts: 35 ✭✭
    Hi Rob . Yes I’ll be glad when check up is over tomorrow. Hoping bloods etc will be ok. Got appointment with my Gp Wednesday to see if she can help with this bowel trouble. I am worrying it’s connected to the cancer though she seems to think not. Think I’ve got low and a bit paranoid over it all. Can’t seem to stop crying and worrying. Thank goodness I’ve found yourself and Lou here. Really helps to talk. Don’t feel so alone. Thank you so much Rob. Hope you are feeling ok. Lots hugs Glo x
  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    @gloden02 ;

    Hi Gloria, 
    It's not unusual how you are thinking and feeling, I am so glad you find it helpful to be here. It's what it's all about.

    I know it's not easy, but try not to dwell too much. When I would be up in the middle of the night, when the thoughts came that caused me to feel sick in my stomach with fear, I got up, and put Downton Abbey on, I watched the whole set of dvd's over a period of time, except one or two episodes which were too close to home. My mind did eventually switch off to my circumstances. Perhaps you could try something like that, or do you like the radio, or music?

    Come and chat anytime Gloria, let us know how you get on tomorrow.

    <3 

    Lou x


  • gloden02gloden02 Posts: 35 ✭✭
    Hi Lou. I have seen my oncologist today for checkup. All bloods very good also good liver and kidney checks. He is very pleased and does not want to see me now until mid May. He is very pleased that my lumps appear on the surface and heal on the surface so far. He said it usually means that’s how it will carry on if and when more lumps appear. So relieved and grateful. He also reassured me that the bowel trouble I’ve got is not connected to the cancer. Going to see my Gp tomorrow re the bowel. Hope to get it sorted and lead a bit of normal life. Thank you for all your kindness and caring. Hope you are well. Glo xxx
  • RobertARobertA Posts: 253 ✭✭✭
    @gloden02 ;
    Hi Glo and yippee. That is easily the best news I have heard this week. I am so so happy for you. 
    Pleased to hear that you are feeling a lot more positive now. Just need get that bowel problem sorted out and you will be as good as new. 👌😀
    Rob X 
  • SunshinedaffSunshinedaff Posts: 356 ✭✭✭
    @gloden02 ;

    Hi Glo, 

    Wonderful to hear such good news for you today. I am so pleased for you, I hope you feel more encouraged now that things are moving in the right direction. Brilliant! =)  =) 
    Glad you are seeing the doc tomorrow re bowel, hopefully there will be a simple explanation and remedy.
    I expect your daughters are pleased for you too.
    Did you mention how you'd been feeling? If not, do it tomorrow.

    I hope this evening is a lot more peaceful for you, keep resting, perhaps try a coffee out after the dr tomorrow, a little treat?


    I am well thank you, save for the Christmas sweets and chocolates that just won't stop falling into my hands!!! =) 

    Lou x


«1
Sign In or Register to comment.