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Ask a Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Amber Thomas RDN

Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

Learn how to separate the guilt and shame from food choices, feel calm and confident when eating, and make choices that support both the body and the soul.

Do you have a question for Amber? Comment below and she'll get back to you with a personalised response.

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We are so excited to welcome Amber to the Live Better With Community!


About Amber

Amber is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and board certified specialist in oncology nutrition with over 15 years experience counselling men and women who have faced a cancer diagnosis. Before starting her private nutrition practice in 2019, she counselled thousands of individuals undergoing and recovering from cancer treatment while being employed in hospitals, cancer clinics, and home health care. Amber has in-depth knowledge of the side effects that come with cancer therapies (surgery, chemo, radiation, etc.), and how nutrition and nourishing the body plays an important role in maintaining strength throughout treatment and healing afterward. 

Amber became interested in oncology nutrition for personal reasons; both of her grandfathers and one of her uncles passed away from different forms of cancer. At first, as a cancer dietitian, she wanted to provide patients and survivors long lists of eating recommendations, foods to eat and foods to avoid, as a way to help. Over time, and through speaking with thousands of cancer survivors, she realized how those lists of foods weren't helpful and led to shame and guilt around food. Amber now realizes that a list of food rules and labeling foods as good and bad is harmful to your healing and well-being. She now teaches cancer patients and survivors how to separate the guilt and shame from food choices, feel calm and confident when eating, and make choices that support both the body and the soul.


When not working, Amber spends time with her husband and two young sons ages 6 and 4 in Denver, Colorado where they live. While born and raised in the States, Amber loves to travel! She attended University College Cork in Ireland for a semester as part of her undergraduate studies (20 years ago), and lived briefly in Malawi, Africa. She has hiked in Peru, Nepal, and Africa as well. One day, she hopes to share her love of travel with her boys! 🌏️❤️

Post your questions below and Amber will get back to you within 72 hours.


Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

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Comments

  • Frances58Frances58 Posts: 1

    I'm having pelvic radiotherapy after hysterectomy last October, and chemotherapy for 6 cycles finishing end of March. I've had 8 sessions so far out of 25.im getting mixed messages on what I can/can't eat. Hubby is diabetic so that isn't helping. High fibre or low fibre. Noone seems to know. This weekend I've had diarrhea and yesterday did not eat till the evening as had no idea what to eat and was frightened of more diarrhea. I need suggestions of meals/foods I can eat, not things I can't.

  • Jan12Jan12 Posts: 3

    Hello, I'm been on hormone treatment following breast cancer for a year now and not had too many aches and pains during the first year. I keep active and have a healthy diet. However, in the last couple of months, I've started to get joint / muscular pain in my shoulder (non-mastectomy side). I am getting this checked out but if it is joint pain or arthritis caused by the hormone treatment, could I make useful adjustments to my diet to help with this? My dilemma is that I do eat eggs, milk, butter, cheese as I want to keep my calcium levels high, but I wonder if dairy foods aren't good if I have arthritis. Please could you advise? Thank you.

  • ChlogambleChlogamble Posts: 6
    edited June 21

    Hi Amber,

    I’m currently going through chemotherapy for ER + and HER2 + breast cancer - I’m 8/8 strongly hormone positive.

    I’ve been hearing so many mixed messages on what is best to eat I.e sugar is bad, don’t eat dairy, don’t drink fizzy drink and definitely no alcohol.

    I also had a GP suggest a plant based diet but I love my meat!

    I’d really appreciate some guidance on how strict I should be with my diet? Is it everything in moderation? I’ve always tried to be healthy with my food with a few treats now and then but I’m now worried that I shouldn’t be having those treats! Also I read somewhere that I shouldn’t eat oranges throughout chemo as it could interact?

    I always eat loads of fruit and veg especially greens to keep my iron levels high. I also take vitamin C and D supplements.

    Any advice greatly appreciated.

    Chloe

  • MrsTMrsT Posts: 11

    Hi Amber, I’ve got ovarian cancer and am about to have my 5th (of 6th) chemos (paclitaxel and carboplatin) then I’ll be having surgery. I’m 64 years old and have no other health conditions.

    What could I eat/drink please to 1) combat extreme tiredness/lack of energy and 2) help my immune system?

    Any supplements I should take, in particular and with Covid 19 in mind, vitamin D?

    Thank you.

  • MarkusMarkus Posts: 6

    Hello Amber

    It’s fantastic to have this opportunity to ask a question!

    I agree with others who have commented on the contradictory information that is available about nutrition and supplements. There’s very little evidence based research on this and very few if any oncology services in the UK that have a more holistic and personalised approach to treatment.

    I have advanced high grade ovarian cancer and am on a second chemo regimen. I’ve asked about diet, if intermittent fasting has benefits, whether there are supplements that maybe useful but not had much info. The stuff online can be confusing to say the least and do understand there will be some contraindications with some diets and supplements.... Here goes!

    What can I to optimise treatment impact and general health? I’m lucky I am fairly fit with no other health issues and while know there’s no magic bullet would appreciate any ideas on what’s best.

    Are you aware of any services in the UK that offer a more integrated conventional and functional medical approach it would be so helpful?

    2 questions - hope that’s ok as I’m sure there are others in similar situation.

    Thank so much for being there!

    😊

  • Tonge1955Tonge1955 Posts: 1

    Hi Amber

    Thank you for the opportunity to ask your advice.

    I am taking Capecitabine for secondary breast cancer in two vertabrae and the head of my femur. Two weeks on with one week off. I'm also taking vitamin D and have an injection every 12 weeks for my bones.

    Please will you advise me on what's best to eat to restore my good cells and help to reduce fatigue (which I get on the odd occasion)?

    Thank you

  • DathiDathi Posts: 2

    Hi Amber

    I am undergoing Chemo at the moment I have had 8 sessions and am starting to feel fatigued another side effect I am suffering is bursitis in my left foot and ankle which is very painful I have been on a course of steroids deltacortril which has had limited effect over the last couple of weeks I have been taking turmeric and black pepper capsules and bathing my foot in warm water Epsom salts and green tea which has brought the swelling right down is there any food you can recommend to help clear this out of my system also drinking lots of water with lemon juice

    Regards

    Dathi

  • KentishgirlKentishgirl Posts: 1

    Hi

    I am taking exestrane and am suffering from constipation. I have increased my fiber intake but it is not helping. Also drinking lots of water. My joints are also very sore.

    There is so much about food supplements so o am very co fused if any of these work or are safe to take.

    Thank tou

  • Blanka_CBlanka_C Posts: 365 Community Admin

    Hello everyone,

    Thank you so much for all the comments and enquiries. Just wanted to let you know that we received all and Amber is going to start working on the answers tomorrow! ❤️

    In the meantime, please feel free to have a look around the forum and join in any discussion you like. :)


    Best wishes,

    Blanka

    Community Admin

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @Frances58 ! Thank you so much for your question.

    For radiotherapy to the pelvic area, especially when you have diarrhea, I usually recommend a low fibre diet and focus on the soluble type when you do eat fibre. The soluble type of fibre can thicken your bowel movements. Dietary fibre/insoluble fibre can be to abrasive in your gut right now and make the diarrhea worse.

    I suggest eating small amounts of bland foods several times (3-4) daily for now. It's also a good idea to keep track of your fluid intake and make sure you are staying hydrated.

    Soluble types of fibre can be found in applesauce, ripe bananas, cooked (soft) carrots, baked potato (no skin).

    Other mild foods that may be tolerated right now include white bread, white rice, white/refined pasta, oatmeal, cooked chicken, and eggs to name a few.

    I've attached a handout for foods that may also work (and some that won't). Please don't hesitate to ask any further questions!

    I hope this helps!


    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @Jan12 ! Thank you for your thoughtful question!

    Unfortunately, there is no clear answer. There isn't enough data currently for me to recommend a specific eating pattern to help with either arthritis or arthralgia (joint pain). Some argue that dairy products lead to inflammation in the body and therefore increase the joint pain, but the actual research on this is NOT consistent.

    If you enjoy dairy foods and want to continue using them, there isn't enough useful research for me to advise against it.

    Of note, small studies link gentle stretching and exercise along with acupuncture to be of benefit for joint pain.

    I hope this helps!

    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @Chlogamble ! Thank you for your question! This is something I speak on quite a bit. I'll try to condense the message, and not write a novel :)

    My first question to you is how are you tolerating chemotherapy? Do you have any side effects that limit how much or the types of foods you can eat? If so, the most important part of nourishing your body right now is eating enough to maintain your muscle tissue and strength. If you have side effects that are fairly easy to manage with minor diet adjustments and/or medications, then we have the ability to speak about variety in your diet.

    I'll address your questions chronologically (and possibly with more questions).

    What is best to eat - typically, the less side effects you have from treatment, the more variety you can include in your day-to-day eating. That said, there is no perfect anti-cancer diet. More on that in a minute.

    Sugar is bad - this is by far the most common question I'm asked! Is sugar bad? Can I eat any? Do I have to cut out all foods with sugar in them? My answer is sugar is not inherently bad and yes, you can include foods that contain sugar in your diet! In fact, trying to eliminate sugar will likely backfire, as we tend to crave and desire the foods that are made off-limits.

    I wrote a blog article on this subject not too long ago. It may provide you more information on why I won't tell you to avoid sugar!

    Don't eat dairy - overall, the research shows no reduction in cancer risk by avoiding dairy.

    Fizzy drinks - my guess is this has to do with the sugar content? Drinks like this can be included in your diet. This is especially true if they help, for instance, settle your stomach from chemo. Again, total avoidance of a food/drink usually means we crave it more, then experience guilt and shame when we "give in."

    Plant-based diet - going vegan (eating only plants, no animal products or byproducts) is not necessary. The research points to eating a variety of fruits and veg in higher amounts. Meat does not need to be eliminated completely. In fact, poultry (chicken, turkey) is considered neutral (body of evidence isn't for or against its consumption) and fish may be slightly protective in colorectal cancer. Some research suggests limiting red meat to 16 oz per week (includes beef, lamb, pork), but that is hardly eliminating it altogether. Other research suggests limiting processed meats.

    Overall, keep your quality of life in mind when you think of your eating patterns. Trying to follow a very strict diet can (1) remove joy from the eating experience (2) isolate you from friends and family, especially at social eating events (3) increase the amount of anxiety and fear you experience when eating the "wrong foods. Plus, there's no evidence that eating in very strict ways will protect from recurrence!

    My suggestion would be to allow some flexibility and enjoyment into your eating. That includes the treats now and then! You mention you already eat loads of fruits and veg. Great! When possible, choose a variety of colors! You also like meat? That's no problem! Enjoy chicken and fish more often than red meat.

    You're correct. Some chemotherapy drugs can interact with Seville orange (also called Bitter Orange). The chemo agents that may interact are etoposide, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, and vindesine. Definitely check with your medical team if you have questions about this possible interaction!

    Vitamin D supplements - have you had your blood level checked?

    Vitamin C - I encourage you to check with your treatment team on taking supplemental vitamin C. Every cancer center tends to view supplements like this differently, and if they should be used during chemo.

    I hope the information I provided helps! Please let me know if you have further questions!

    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @MrsT ! This is a great question!

    First off, how did the first 4 cycles of chemo go? Were you able to eat in a fairly usual/normal way, or did you experience side effects that changed how much/what you ate?

    In order to prepare for surgery, it's important to eat enough total food, adequate protein, and maintain your hydration levels.

    If you could answer a couple of questions, I may be able to guide you a bit better:

    1. Are you able to maintain your weight during chemotherapy?
    2. Have you/are you experiencing any side effects from treatment that change how you eat?

    Of note, I don't recommend any dietary or herbal supplements before surgery. There is the possibility of interaction with the anesthesia, and many supplements thin the blood which is risky before surgery.

    Vitamin Dshould not be a problem, but I would recommend letting your surgery team know if you take it and how much.

    I look forward to hearing your answers so I can better guide you!

    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @Markus ! Thank you for your question!

    Yes, there is so much conflicting data and contradictory information on diet, supplements, and other complimentary practices.

    First, allow me to address the diet portion. As you mentioned, there are no magic bullets or perfect anti-cancer eating plans.From a holistic viewpoint, have you considered other options outside of food/nutrition and supplements, like mind-body therapies (such as acupuncture, aromatherapy, meditation,etc.)? My recommendations on diet are based on any existing side effects as well, as I would want to ensure your body is nourished and supported.

    Dietary and herbal supplements are a tricky thing. They are typically not well regulated or well studied. Some can work against your current chemotherapy regimen.

    I personally feel that the research on intermittent fasting is too new to offer clear answers or recommend its use. I also recommend against this approach if you struggle to eat and drink enough due to chemotherapy side effects.

    I'm not aware of any integrative/functional medicine clinics in the UK. If I come across any, I will definitely let you know!

    I hope this information helps in some small way. I'm happy to be here and answer any additional questions!

    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @Tonge1955! Great question!

    There isn't much in terms of specific foods to increase blood cells. Generally speaking, eating enough foods and with variety allows your body to use those nutrients to replenish the blood. Make sure to include a protein source at all meals/snacks as well.

    This article provides some guidelines on precautions to take if certain blood counts are low (neutropenia).

    Gentle exercise/movement can help with fatigue as well as eating and drinking enough food to support your healing. Always check with your treatment team/physician about any new exercises.

    I hope this helps!

    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @Dathi ! Thank you for your thoughtful question!

    Could you clarify what agent you would like to clear out of your system? I'm going to answer the question as if you are referring to the chemotherapy. If that's not the case, please let me know!

    In order for the chemo to be as effective as possible, it's important to allow the drug to run its full course. Any product, herbal or otherwise, that may speed up how fast the body clears the drug may work against you. You may not receive the full dose/strength of chemo.

    Turmeric isn't known as a supplement that speeds up drug clearance, but it can increase your risk of bleeding. Like any herbal supplement, I encourage you to let your treatment team know you are taking turmeric with black pepper if they are not aware.

    Staying hydrated is very helpful and an important part of treatment.

    I hope this information is helpful!

    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @Kentishgirl ! Thank you for your question!

    I'm sorry to hear the constipation doesn't seem to be improving with additional fiber and fluids. There are some additional things you can try or consider, based on how you answer the following questions:

    1. Are you on any sort of pain medications or other medications known to cause constipation? If so, sometimes diet alone isn't enough to resolve constipation. There are over-the-counter medications that can help you produce soft bowel movements. My usual advise is to ask your treatment team what they recommend, as there are alot of different medications that work in different ways.
    2. If there are no other medications, consider trying any of the following:
    • warm prune juice, starting with 2-4 ounces at a time
    • increase your physical activity if you are able. even walking can help stimulate the bowels
    • drink other warm beverages during the day
    • increase fiber only if you are still able to eat enough to maintain your weight and strength. fiber can be filling, and if you are unable to eat enough, eating alot of fiber will take the place of other nutrients your body needs to heal

    Here is a handout that may be helpful as well!


    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • MrsTMrsT Posts: 11

    Hi and thanks @Amber_Thomas_RDN

    The first 4 chemos (which are at 3 weekly intervals) have gone well but it takes me longer each time to regain energy. I haven’t suffered from nausea, sore mouth or anything like that but I do just lack much appetite for around 4/5 days after each session. I therefore lose around 1.5kg in that time which I then regain before the next session as my appetite improves. I wouldn’t say my appetite is fully back to normal though.

    I’m not overweight (5 foot 3 inches tall and 121 pounds) and usually eat healthily, the 80/20 rule but that’s slipped a bit with chemo - maybe 60/40 - when you’ve not much appetite and need to calorie load, a chocolate biscuit slips down quite nicely! I was therefore interested and relieved to read your blog about sugar you referenced in response to another query.

    I’ll ask my oncologist about vitamin D, I have a telephone consultation with her later this morning.

  • SueGabblingSueGabbling Posts: 3

    Hi, I am 4 months past chemotherapy for DLBCL spinal lymphoma and have a lot of pain in my shoulders and spinal ligaments and tendons, also have peripheral neuropathy in feet and hands. I eat a well balanced diet with lots of fresh fruit, veg and salad. is there any particular food that might help with nerve damage, ligament and tendon repair?

  • MarkusMarkus Posts: 6

    Hi @Amber_Thomas_RDN - thank you so much for your prompt and very considered response to me. I have also read your replies to others, and they are also really helpful. I know difficult it must be to tailor answers when we are all so different.

    It's great that you and the others on this site understand how people with a cancer diagnosis want to be empowered to do the small things that may make a big difference in day to day life and into outcomes, but that there is also a lot of misinformation out there.

    As for me, I do meditate and practice relaxation, would love to see a reflexologist or try acupuncture, but a the moment the Covid situation has made accessing complimentary therapies impossible for the time being.

    Sincere thanks again x

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @MrsT !

    Thank you for the follow up information! That's incredibly helpful.

    It's very common to experience the weight fluctuations as you have during cycles. Unfortunately, when weight is lost due to side effects like poor appetite, both fat and muscle tissue (along with changes in tissues from possible dehydration) are lost. When the weight is regained, it's usually fat and fluid mass (not muscle). This can affect your levels of tiredness and energy.

    I'm so glad to see you are putting your need for calorie load first, above trying to eat in a certain way or restrict certain foods! When you allow yourself to stay nourished with any food you tolerate, including the chocolate bisquit :), you are providing your body the energy it needs to heal and recover.

    I encourage you to continue prioritizing high calorie high protein foods when you don't feel like eating. If possible, include a protein source with each meal. Eating enough protein can really help stabilize your muscle tissue, but only if you are also eating enough total calories!


    I recommend the same strategies to prepare for surgery: make sure you are eating enough total calories as much as possible, and include a protein source every time you eat (eggs, dairy, meats, beans, pulses, etc.). Try to stay hydrated as well!

    If you really struggle to eat, have you tried shakes or smoothies on the days your appetite is poor? Depending on what you like and what type of foods you have available, you can build a drink that is both high calorie, high protein, contains fluids, and is easy to get down.

    Please let me know if you need further suggestions! Here are some handouts that may help as well.


    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @SueGabbling ! Thank you for your question!

    I'm sorry to hear about the pain you're experiencing.

    First, I'll address the peripheral neuropathy (PN). I've reviewed the research available through my Natural Medicines Database, and am not finding any herbal supplements that are rated as effective to treat PN. A compound called L-Glutamine (an amino acid or protein building block) has been studied for it's positive effects on PN.

    I recommend speaking with your doctor about possibly using L-Glutamine if that interests you.

    I've done some research on any foods or compounds that may help with the tendons and ligaments, and I've not found anything of value.

    I encourage you to provide enough nourishment for your body along with food variety and adequate protein in order to help you heal.

    I hope that helps!

    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @Markus ! Thank you for your kind and thoughtful words. I'm so glad you've found the information I've posted helpful!

    You are so right. There is SO much misinformation out there, and it can be incredibly misleading and harmful! I can't begin to imagine the stress of undergoing treatment AND trying to sift through all of the nonsense.

    I'm also glad you actively participate in other practices to support your body and mind! Agreed, Covid has added a completely new barrier to both cancer care and self-care.

    While not directly related to food and nutrition, I encourage many of my clients to use the guided meditations and self-compassion exercises found on this website.

    If you decide to give it a listen, I would love to know what you think!

    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • MarkusMarkus Posts: 6

    Hi @Amber_Thomas_RDN

    Really appreciate this. I will definitely have a look so thank you for the recommendation. I have found the 'Calm' app helpful to date and am always keen to try different approaches.

    There are for more options for reputable integrated cancer treatment approaches in the USA. That maybe partly linked to the different ways our respective health services are funded. I really appreciate your offer of letting me know if, via your contacts and networks, you become aware of anything in the UK. I did find something, but it has gone quiet! I worked in our NHS all my career so am aware of how fantastic it is, but also the constraints.

    In the meantime I'll continue to look at your replies to the others who have posed questions as there is often something in there that is interesting and potentially useful to me.

    Thank you once again for your support and such thoughtful and balanced responses.

  • MrsTMrsT Posts: 11

    Thanks @Amber_Thomas_RDN , that’s really helpful.

    When I spoke to my oncologist yesterday, she confirmed it’s ok for me to take Vitamin D but no other supplements.

    Thanks again, really appreciate your advice.

  • DeniseFuDeniseFu Posts: 2

    Hello Amber I had a whipple three years ago after loosing lots of other body organs to cancers I a n suffering with daily diarrhoea which looks very acidic this is very draining and also have severe pain under my right ribs after doing excercise I struggle to walk more than a mile because I get very breathless my consultant tells me to take more creon it doesn’t help much can u advice please

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    @Markus,

    I've heard great things about the calm app, so I'm glad you've found it beneficial as well!

    We definitely have a number of integrative medicine clinics and practices here in the States. I've asked some of my colleagues about clinics in the UK, but have yet to here back.

    It my is pleasure! Please feel free to ask further questions as they come up!

    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @MrsT ,

    I'm so glad you found the information helpful and that your doctor confirmed you can take the vitamin D.

    It's my pleasure! Please don't hesitate to reach out with further questions!

    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • Amber_Thomas_RDNAmber_Thomas_RDN Posts: 42 Cancer Nutrition Specialist

    Hi @DeniseFu,

    I'm so sorry you're experiencing such symptoms!

    Dosing pancreatic enzymes is a fairly customized process, as it's helpful to know what types of foods you are eating, when the diarrhea occurs (after every meal, only certain meals, right away, etc), and if they all look fairly the same (floating, smelling, etc).

    Creon comes in different doses. Which one are you taking (for example, 3,000 USP units of lipase) and how many caps per meal?

    I've included a handout on some of the general guidelines around using pancreatic enzymes. If possible, please review that information to see if any of the steps can be used in your particular case. If you are following the guidelines listed, we can look closer at the dose, enzyme type, and possible dietary modifications.

    Please let me know what you think!


    Registered Dietitian | Cancer Nutrition Specialist | Online Nutrition Coach

    websitehttps://www.cancernutritionsolutions.com

    instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/amber.thomas.rdn/

  • mrbrn12mrbrn12 Posts: 1

    I'm on tamoxifen post lumpectomy for DCIS. Am 4'8" and have gained 1 0 pounds in spite of eating healthy and exercising regularly. Any suggestions? I track my food and am consuming 1000-1100 calories daily. Thank you, Marie Buccellato

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